Itshoni – Coquitlam, BC


Itshoni Restaurant
505-329 North Road
Coquitlam, BC
(604) 931-8460

Itshoni (in my eyes, a misspelling of the romaji for the Japanese word ‘together’) emerged from the space previously occupied by the Blue Sea Seafood Restaurant, and is serving up a mix of Korean and Japanese cuisine. It is conveniently located in this high traffic shopping complex that is home to many other places where one can a meal – many of which reported on here at foodosophy.

The interior has received a noticeable makeover with most of the former enclosed spaces and booths removed and replaced with dark wooden tables and chairs.  The floor looked re-done as well, in addition to the similarly colored wall treatments and refreshed with new art hanging on the walls.  The mural on one of the side walls (not pictured here) really stands out.  The place was filled well with both Asian and non-Asian customers (this table of nine got filled up by a big group of women minutes after we were seated nearby).

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Kishu River – Vancouver, BC


Kishu River Japanese Restaurant
3339 Kingsway Street
Vancouver, BC
(604) 433-8857

After a long day that culminated in an early evening flight out of Calgary back to Vancouver, I’d completely forgotten that I had promised the week before to meet up with some friends for some last night drinks. In a rush to meet up with the crew, who’s whereabouts were uncertain other than I knew they’d be on the east side, I made a mad dash from the airport into the general vicinity.  Dying for something to eat as I’d had nothing since the noon hour, I headed southeastward on Kingsway until I saw Kishu River on the other side of the street.  Yes, after an uneventful eating experience in southern Alberta, I had a sushi craving that had to be satisfied, no matter what the risk…

Yes folks, another edition of “round and round we go, where we stop, nobody knows”.  Call it the shotgun approach or solo game of Russian roulette, I once again stepped bravely into an unknown establishment with no fear…. well perhaps a touch of hesitation.  The view from the entrance area sparked nothing in me to be pleasantly surprised nor want to head back out the direction I came from.  A couple of booths lined up on both sides of the room, with the sushi bar way at the back, and the access to the hidden kitchen to the back right.  Once spotted by the lone waitress, I was lead to my table and handed a menu booklet.  I quickly asked for some green tea and that was brought to me minutes later.

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One More Sushi – Vancouver, BC


One More Sushi
222-2155 Allison Road
Vancouver, BC
(604) 228 9773

One More Sushi on Urbanspoon

Located on the second floor of  mixed commercial/residential complex just behind University Village at UBC, One More Sushi is impossible to see from the road.  With three other places (Suga Sushi, Osaka Sushi, Omio Japanese Restaurant) in the same general area that also serve up their take on sushi, it makes for a very condensed location for Japanese food.  As such, unless you knew about it from actually walking in the area, I highly doubt you ever knew it exists and most people probably satisfy their sushi fix at one of the other better known and more visible places.

As it occupies a more spacious area, the seating floorspace is clearly the largest of the sushi serving restaurants in this geographical area.  A long narrow entranceway leads into this space, with the sushi bar along one side that leads back to the kitchen area, as well as a bar station that is located nearby as well.  As the lighting was incredibly dark, and we were seated at the opposite end, I could not be sure but it appeared like there were private rooms at the other side of the room.  The decor was your typical, North American interpretation of what a Japanese restaurant “should look like”, with cheap pictures and paintings hanging on the walls.  One more thing I would mention is that the heating, or lack there of, made the place very cold – something that people who have gone there on multiple occassions have told me never changes.   So dress warmly!

In the mood just to share a few appetizers and get a sample of their sushi, our table chose a basic spinach Gomae, which had a weak flavored but really thick consistency to their sesame paste/dressing.  Not the good first food impression we were hoping for.  This was followed by a serving of the Agedashi Tofu.  It had a very thin layer of coating and the tofu itself was fresh and very soft.  Perhaps they could have fried it a bit longer and provided a more flavorful broth to accompany it.  Two appetizers in, and I was disappointed at how lighthanded they were with the depth of flavor in both.

Not my selection, but this is the Yam Tempura Maki.  I don’t tend to like sweet things in sushi nor maki in general, so I am not the best person to be commenting on this plate.  The piece I had confirmed my preferences, not that I can’t eat it

Lastly, as I was somewhat hesitant to try any nigiri, I elected to go with the Chirashidon.  That way I could at least try to get a semblance of the quality of their product, freshness and skill in cutting.  It came in a rather smallish bowl which was fine as too many places put this in a large one and compensate by filling it with too much sushi rice.  It turned out the ingredients themselves were simply average – not horrifically bad that I couldn’t eat it, but not overly enthusiastic at the same time either.

Apologies for the poor quality of pictures, as they were taken with my mobile, but I hope you were able to form some image in your mind of what each dish looked and tasted like.  With its seemingly strong level of popularity with the student crowd at UBC, I imagine One More Sushi will continue to be a relatively busy place despite its shortcomings and pumping out just average/sub-standard fare.  I just know it won’t have me coming back, One More Time…

One More Sushi on Urbanspoon