Angkor Restaurant – Vancouver, BC


Angkor Restaurant
4884 Victoria Drive
Vancouver, BC
(604) 568-0770

[shokutsu] After hearing through the local foodie grapevine that a new Cambodian restaurant was open on the city’s east side, I knew I had to make a stopover.  Not surprisingly, GastronomyDomine had reached this place before me, and thus I’ve asked him to collaborate with me on this piece on Angkor Restaurant.  Our thoughts our interspersed below…

[GastronomyDomine] Like Phnom Penh’s food, I would describe the food here as “Chinese-Cambonian” – the cuisine that evolved from the Chinese diaspora throught Cambodia. (Specifically the Chiu Chow (Toechow) Chinese who intermarried and became “Khmer-Chen”).

As an aside, Vietnamese cuisine evolved in a similar way from this migration (which also naturally occurred in Vietnam given the geographic proximity). Food we now associated with “Vietnamese” is quite often of Chinese origin – eg the noodle dishes like Pho, and Dry Egg Noodles, etc.

Pure Khmer cuisine is quite different. It is similar to some of the foods we associate as Thai. You can see the influences of Khmer cuisine in the use of curry spices, fermented fish products, and the like.

I noted that the proprietors (who are Cambodian) – decided to use the Vietnamese names for the dishes – obviously to appeal to the large Viet community here. Cambodian food is “ethnic” food in Vietnam.

On my recent visit there I found out that the proprietors are blood-related to the owner of Phnom Penh – a good pedigree.

[shokutsu] After sharing a meal earlier this summer at Chinatown’s Phnom Penh, I enlisted the company of a foodosopher associate to join me for a Saturday lunch here – mainly to do a comparison of the chicken wings.

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Phnom Penh – Vancouver, BC


Phnom Penh Restaurant
244 E Georgia St.
Vancouver, BC
Tel: 604 682-5777

Phnom Penh on Urbanspoon

inside_phnom_penh

One restaurant that has never failed me is Phnom Penh – the Cambodian-Vietnamese restaurant on the outskirts of Chinatown. I have yet to have a bad meal there…which is remarkable for such a busy place. I can always count on the cooks there to serve me food with big, bold yet balanced and nuanced flavours. I’m not one to hyperbolize about dining experiences, but I must say that I have taken many friends, colleagues, out-of-towners to this place and they have all invariably declared the meal as one of the best they have had. One particular food-loving colleague from Los Angeles  emails me regularly to tell me that he craves a couple of their signature dishes and is constantly looking for excuses to fly up to Vancouver.

sign_phnom_penh

The restaurant describes itself as Cambodian-Vietnamese – two cuisines which will have much in common given the geographic proximity of the two countries. (The food from Laos and parts of Thailand are similar as well). The Khmer (Cambodian) and Vietnamese names of many dishes are often phonetically identical.

Much of the cuisine in this region all have certain elements in common – the use of souring ingredients (such as  tamarind, citrus); the use of strongly scented green herbs (cilantro, asian basils, lemongrass, kaffir, and so forth); fresh or pickled (instead of dried) pepper; the use of fermented fish sauces and pastes (nuoc nam, kapi); and the use of curry spices (turmeric, star anise, galangal, and so forth).

Also common to the cuisines is the general presentational philosophy of “fresh” balanced with “savory”. Pho, as an example, will always be presented to the diner with a plateful of herbs and greens as a counterpoint the savoriness of the broth. To indulge the diner further – a wedge of lime of almost always provided to allow for adjustment the sour note. This philosophy lends an appealing “brightness” to the cuisine. Cambodian and Vietnamese cuisine do diverge somewhat – for example, Cambodian cuisine tends to be more pungent with fermented fishy flavours and the use of ripe tamarind paste is more prevalent.

I tend to order from the “Cambodian” section of the menu with forays into the “Vietnamese” section for a couple of particular favorite dishes. The selection of dishes between the two sections of the menu are similar but distinct enough to highlight the unique aspects of each cuisine.

garlic_chicken_wings_phnom_penh

My favorite dishes at Phnom Penh are their rightly famous garlic Chicken Wings (which comes with an lime juice and pepper dipping sauce), their Banh Xeo (their Vietnamese rice flour crepe filled with pork and sprouts), Black Pepper Squid (a wok-fried, tender and peppery concoction), Butter Beef (a superb dish of sliced rare beef with a good drizzle of a soy and nuoc nam based sauce), and their fried Frogs Legs (I didn’t have it today).
butter_beef_phnom_penh

I did find a new favorite on this visit: The Loc Lac which is the Khmer version of the Vietnamese dish Bo Luc Lac – more commonly known as “Shaking Beef” (due to the preparation method and not the on-plate antics of the beef slices).

shaking_beef_phnom_penh

The meal was excellent yet again. The service was perfunctory yet prompt and efficient…which is all I really want in a place like this. Be forewarned about the long lunch hour lineups. It is a very popular place.

Phnom Penh on Urbanspoon