Foodosophy of Streetfood in Vancouver


This turned out to the biggest disappointment on my most recent visit to Portland. Nong’s Khao Man Gai – the now famous Thai-style Hainanese Chicken food cart at the cart pod at 10th and Alder had just closed as I walked up to it. Next time.

With Vancouver’s street food scene starting to warm up, my visit gave me a chance to observe what Portland is “doing right” in its own cart scene. Since it is very early into the City of Vancouver’s fledgling street food initiative, I am hoping the Vancouver regulators recognize certain key factors which I believe are responsible for Portland’s impressive cart scene.

Continue reading

Advertisements

foodography – tokyo stopover


A brief stay in Japan’s capital city before heading westward for two weeks in South Korea…

Continue reading

Pommes Frites – New York City, NY


Pommes Frites
123 2nd Avenue
New York, NY 10003-8319
(212) 674-1234

I’ve discussed my never ending obsession with French Fries many times before, so i’ll endeavor to keep this short. In my experiences with  Belgian Fries from Vancouver, and and Duck Fat from Maine, i’ve developed a pretty clear understanding of what im looking for in a french fry. Crisp outside, fluffy inside, flavourful, and a bit meatier than thin fries. On reputation alone, Pommes Frites in New York is often mentioned as one of the best.

I used to wander by this tiny storefront in the East Village all the time. It’s square on my walking path from Ippudo, to Katz’s Deli and Russ and Daughters. With Caracas around the corner, there wasn’t a hope that i’d ever have the room left in my stomach to try it. Then i heard it was really good, so i figured before Arepas, after Pastrami, Akamaru Modern, and some Lox, i’d share some fries with a friend.

Continue reading

Hugo’s – Houston, TX


Hugo’s
1600 Westheimer Road
Houston, TX
(713) 524-7744

People will argue that Mexican food gets better the closer you get to Mexico. While this makes sense in theory, it doesn’t always work in practice. Texas, for example, is right across the border but has adapted Mexican food and made it their own – the birth of Tex-Mex pretty much means that real Mexican is difficult to find. Great Mexican? Even more difficult.

In the Westheimer area in Houston, Hugo’s Restaurant is trying to change that perception. Serving high quality Mexican cuisine that represents the best of all regional cuisines, I have to admit, I’m a bit skeptical. Places that try to represent too many different cuisines  have a tendency to be good at all, but master of none.

From the large gated doors to the vaulted ceilings and chandeliers, the space is 1925 traditional with elements of contemporary. I don’t see the supposed elements of “chic” they are aiming for, but it’s a reasonably nice atmosphere characterized mostly by the slightly uncomfortably large gaps of space between tables.

Continue reading